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10 Tips for Becoming a Locavore Slideshow

10 Tips for Becoming a Locavore Slideshow

Jane Bruce

Check the shelf tags and labels for produce origins and chose the produce that is grown closest to your home. "Every time you can buy something that supports your local community and local food system, it’ll have a big impact," Steinmetz advises.

Read Shelf Tags and Labels

Jane Bruce

Check the shelf tags and labels for produce origins and chose the produce that is grown closest to your home. "Every time you can buy something that supports your local community and local food system, it’ll have a big impact," Steinmetz advises.

Add Local Food to Your Holiday Meal

Jane Bruce

Add a local food to your holiday meal and talk to your family about where it was produced.

Ask Your Butcher About Local Meat

Jane Bruce

Ask your local meat butcher for any meat which is within your state or county, and purchase this.

Purchase Local Goods This Holiday Season

Jane Bruce

Celebrate local with holiday purchases from local farmers such as honey, maple syrup, nuts, etc. Be sure to add the name of the farmer and location, if possible.

Make Buying Local a Weekly Ritual

Our weekend ritual includes a stop at our local bakery for the bread for the week. Find a ritual that supports a local food business and shop regularly.

Ask the Grocery Manager About Local Products

"The produce manager will be as responsive to you as possible. Managers pay attention to who is asking, what’s being asked, and what people are asking for. They know their vendors and when products come in, and can give you the most useful advice," says Steinmetz.

Choose Brands Close to Home

Jane Bruce

Check the labels on the stocked shelf items of the grocery store to choose the brand closest to your home. "I recently found a mustard made in our state," says Steinmetz.

Order Local Items at Restaurants

Ask your local restaurant if they buy local food and congratulate them on their purchase, then try the menu item!

Grow Your Own Herbs

Jane Bruce

Buy a pot and seeds to grow your own culinary herbs, either inside or outside.

Meet a Farmer

Jane Bruce

"Farmers will feel supported. If someone cares enough to meet them, they’ll provide a lot of background and knowledge about the produce consumers are buying. They’re proud of their work and will often have tips on how to use their product more effectively."


10 tips on how to make slides that communicate your idea, from TED’s in-house expert

When your slides rock, your whole presentation pops to life. At TED2014, David Epstein created a clean, informative slide deck to support his talk on the changing bodies of athletes. Photo: James Duncan Davidson/TED

Aaron Weyenberg is the master of slide decks. Our UX Lead creates Keynote presentations that are both slick and charming—the kind that pull you in and keep you captivated, but in an understated way that helps you focus on what’s actually being said. He does this for his own presentations and for lots of other folks in the office. Yes, his coworkers ask him to design their slides, because he’s just that good.

We asked Aaron to bottle his Keynote mojo so that others could benefit from it. Here, 10 tips for making an effective slide deck, split into two parts: the big, overarching goals, and the little tips and tricks that make your presentation sing.

Aaron used this image of a New Zealand disaster to kick off a slide deck from TED’s tech team — all about how they prepares for worst-case scenarios. He asked for permission to use the image, and credited the photographer, Blair Harkness. View the whole slidedeck from this presentation.

  1. Think about your slides last. Building your slides should be the tail end of developing your presentation. Think about your main message, structure its supporting points, practice it and time it—and then start thinking about your slides. The presentation needs to stand on its own the slides are just something you layer over it to enhance the listener experience. Too often, I see slide decks that feel more like presenter notes, but I think it’s far more effective when the slides are for the audience to give them a visual experience that adds to the words.
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  2. Create a consistent look and feel. In a good slide deck, each slide feels like part of the same story. That means using the same or related typography, colors and imagery across all your slides. Using pre-built master slides can be a good way to do that, but it can feel restrictive and lead to me-too decks. I like to create a few slides to hold sample graphic elements and type, then copy what I need from those slides as I go.
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  3. Think about topic transitions. It can be easy to go too far in the direction of consistency, though. You don’t want each slide to look exactly the same. I like to create one style for the slides that are the meat of what I’m saying, and then another style for the transitions between topics. For example, if my general slides have a dark background with light text, I’ll try transition slides that have a light background with dark text. That way they feel like part of the same family, but the presentation has texture—and the audience gets a visual cue that we’re moving onto a new topic.
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  4. With text, less is almost always more. One thing to avoid—slides with a lot of text, especially if it’s a repeat of what you’re saying out loud. It’s like if you give a paper handout in a meeting—everyone’s head goes down and they read, rather than staying heads-up and listening. If there are a lot of words on your slide, you’re asking your audience to split their attention between what they’re reading and what they’re hearing. That’s really hard for a brain to do, and it compromises the effectiveness of both your slide text and your spoken words. If you can’t avoid having text-y slides, try to progressively reveal text (like unveiling bullet points one by one) as you need it.
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  5. Use photos that enhance meaning. I love using simple, punchy photos in presentations, because they help what you’re saying resonate in your audience’s mind without pulling their attention from your spoken words. Look for photos that (1) speak strongly to the concept you’re talking about and (2) aren’t compositionally complex. Your photo could be a metaphor or something more literal, but it should be clear why the audience is looking at it, and why it’s paired with what you’re saying. For example, I recently used the image above—a photo of a container ship about to tip over (it eventually sank)—to lead off a co-worker’s deck about failure preparation. And below is another example of a photo I used in a deck to talk about the launch of the new TED.com. The point I was making was that a launch isn’t the end of a project—it’s the beginning of something new. We’ll learn, adapt, change and grow.

Here, a lovely image from a slidedeck Aaron created about the redesign of TED.com . View the whole deck from this presentation .

And now some tactical tips…

  1. Go easy on the effects and transitions. Keynote and Powerpoint come with a lot of effects and transitions. In my opinion, most of these don’t do much to enhance the audience experience. At worst, they subtly suggest that the content of your slides is so uninteresting that a page flip or droplet transition will snap the audience out of their lethargy. If you must use them, use the most subtle ones, and keep it consistent.
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  2. Use masking to direct attention in images. If you want to point something out in a photo, you could use a big arrow. Or you could do what I call a dupe-and-mask. I do this a lot when showing new page designs, particularly when I don’t want the audience to see the whole design until I’m finished talking about individual components of it. Here’s the original image.Here’s the process for masking it. (1) Set the image transparency to something less than 100. (2) Duplicate that image so there is one directly over the top of the other. (3) Set the dup’d image transparency back to 100. and (4) Follow the technique here to mask the dup’d image. You’ll end up with something that looks like this.You can use this technique to call out anything you want in a screenshot. A single word, a photo, a section of content—whatever you want your audience to focus on.
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  3. Try panning large images. Often, I want to show screen shot of an entire web page in my presentations. There’s a great Chrome extension to capture these—but these images are oftentimes much longer than the canvas size of the presentation. Rather than scaling the image to an illegible size, or cropping it, you can pan it vertically as you talk about it. In Keynote, this is done with a Move effect, which you can apply from an object’s action panel.
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  4. For video, don’t use autoplay. It’s super easy to insert video in Keynote and Powerpoint—you just drag a Quicktime file onto the slide. And when you advance the deck to the slide with the video that autoplays, sometimes it can take a moment for the machine to actually start playing it. So often I’ve seen presenters click again in an attempt to start the video during this delay, causing the deck to go to the next slide. Instead, set the video to click to play. That way you have more predictable control over the video start time, and even select a poster frame to show before starting.
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  5. Reproduce simple charts and graphs. Dropping an image of a chart into a presentation is fine, but it almost always disrupts the feel of a deck in unsightly fashion. If the graph data is simple enough (and you have some extra time) there’s a way to make it much more easy on the eyes. You could redraw it in the native presentation application. That sounds like needless work, and it might be for your purposes, but it can really make your presentation feel consistent and thought-through, of one flavor from soup to nuts. You’ll have control over colors, typography, and more. Here are some examples.
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Lastly, I’d love to leave you with a couple book recommendations. The first is Resonate, by Nancy Duarte. It’s not so much about slides, but about public speaking in general – which is the foundation for any presentation, regardless of how great your slides are. In it, she breaks down the anatomy of what makes a great presentation, how to establish a central message and structure your talk, and more. (One of her case studies comes from Benjamin Zander’s charming TED Talk about classical music, a talk that captivated the audience from start to finish.) Think of this as prerequisite reading for my second recommendation, also by Duarte: Slide:ology. This is more focused on presentation visuals and slides.


1. Write a script.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.

That&rsquos bass-ackwards. Since the point of your slides is to illustrate and expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should know what you intend to say and then figure out how to visualize it. Unless you are an expert at improvising, make sure you write out or at least outline your presentation before trying to put together slides.

And make sure your script follows good storytelling conventions: give it a beginning, middle, and end have a clear arc that builds towards some sort of climax make your audience appreciate each slide but be anxious to find out what&rsquos next and when possible, always leave &lsquoem wanting more.


2. Satay Zucchini Noodles

When you need to keep carbs or total calories in check but are craving noodles, using zucchini as the noodles is one culinary trick. Doing so in this Asian-style dish makes it both fresh and filling. But it's the flavors, textures and beauty that'll bring you back to this recipe again and again. Use one zucchini and one yellow summer squash for the best-looking results -- especially in spring and summer when these vegetables are at their best. In other seasons, try other carb-friendly noodles like shirataki noodles or bean pasta. And if you're a beef aficionado, you can make this recipe with the addition of grass-fed steak, transforming the main dish into a marvelous meal. CALORIES PER SERVING: 287

When you need to keep carbs or total calories in check but are craving noodles, using zucchini as the noodles is one culinary trick. Doing so in this Asian-style dish makes it both fresh and filling. But it's the flavors, textures and beauty that'll bring you back to this recipe again and again. Use one zucchini and one yellow summer squash for the best-looking results -- especially in spring and summer when these vegetables are at their best. In other seasons, try other carb-friendly noodles like shirataki noodles or bean pasta. And if you're a beef aficionado, you can make this recipe with the addition of grass-fed steak, transforming the main dish into a marvelous meal. CALORIES PER SERVING: 287


3. Everyday Green Smoothie

True to it's name, this green smoothie recipe is great to have on hand for everyday use. It isn't too sweet, and it's balanced with plant-based protein (chia seeds) and a healthy dose of greens for good measure. The apple cider vinegar and sea salt might sound like odd additions, but they add just the right amount of acid and umami to round out all the flavors. CALORIES: 158

See Full Recipe and Nutrition Info: Everyday Green Smoothie

True to it's name, this green smoothie recipe is great to have on hand for everyday use. It isn't too sweet, and it's balanced with plant-based protein (chia seeds) and a healthy dose of greens for good measure. The apple cider vinegar and sea salt might sound like odd additions, but they add just the right amount of acid and umami to round out all the flavors. CALORIES: 158

See Full Recipe and Nutrition Info: Everyday Green Smoothie


Eliminate All Distractions, Once and for All

As Jim Rohn says, &ldquoWhat is easy to do is also easy not to do.&rdquo And this is an underlying principle that will carry through in all aspects of communication. Distractions are a surefire way to ensure a lack of understanding or interpretation of a conversation, which in turn, will create inefficiencies and a poor foundation for communication.

This should come as no surprise, especially in this day in age where people are constantly distracted by social media, text messaging, and endlessly checking their emails. We&rsquore stuck in a cultural norm that has hijacked our love for the addictive dopamine rush and altered our ability to truly focus our efforts on the task at hand. And these distractions aren&rsquot just distractions for the time they&rsquore being used. They use up coveted brainpower and central processes that secondarily delay our ability to get back on track.

Gloria Mark, a researcher at UC Irvine, discovered that it takes an average of 23 minutes and 15 seconds for our brains to reach their peak state of focus after an interruption. [6] Yes, you read that correctly&mdashdistractions are costly, error-prone, and yield little to no benefit outside of a bump to the ego when receiving a new like on your social media profile.

Meetings should implement a no-phone policy, video conference calls should be set on their own browser with no other tabs open, and all updates, notifications, and email prompt should be immediately turned off, if possible, to eliminate all distractions during a meeting.

These are just a few examples of how we can optimize our environment to facilitate the highest levels of communication within the workplace.


Sheets don't wear like your gym shorts or jeans, but you do spend a lot of time in them &mdash and night after night, germs, sweat, and body oils accumulate quickly.

"If there are no stains, there's no need pretreat the sheets," says Forte. "But it's always a good idea to check pillowcases for makeup residue. A prewash stain remover like Shout Advanced Ultra Gel can help get any spots out." Then add detergent, like Good Housekeeping Seal holder Gain Liquid Detergent.

Some new washers have dedicated cycles just for washing sheets. But if yours doesn't, select the "normal" or "casual" cycle instead of "heavy duty." "Sheets don't need excessive agitation to get clean, and the heavy-duty cycle can cause tangling and wrinkling," says Forte.

To boost cleaning (which helps if you suffer from allergies), increase the water temperature. Choose a cleaning cycle that uses the hottest water safe for the sheets' fabric (check the care tag). "The hotter the water, the more germs you kill," says Forte. Once done, fold and store your sheets until you're ready to put them on your bed.


10 All-Natural, Homemade Cleaning Solutions to Scrub Every Inch of Your Home

You can make these simple, green cleaning solutions yourself.

The next time you have a sink to scrub or a window to wipe, no need to run to the store: just raid your cupboards and mix up a homemade cleaning solution. Everyday products like club soda (the bubbles help break down stains by loosening grime), vinegar (the acidity inhibits the growth of bacteria and prevents mold and mildew from forming),ਊnd even vodka (a proven germ eliminator) make for fast, cheap, and effective homemade cleaners. They&aposre natural, too.

These DIY cleaners include everything from a homemade all-purpose cleaner to a natural glass cleaner and a solution for grimy hardwood floors. We have the ingredients you need𠅌hances are, you already have most of them—plus the steps for mixing up the cleaning solutions and using them.

Homemade or natural cleaning solutions use simple chemicals and ingredients to remove grime, deodorize, and, in some cases, even disinfect surfaces. They&aposre great for making surfaces look sparkling-clean. Still, if you&aposre trying to disinfect or sanitize a surface, you may be better off turning to a store-bought disinfectant (preferably one approved by the FDA to kill bacteria and viruses) to ensure you&aposve removed any harmful entities. For every day cleaning, though, these homemade solutions might be just what you need.

What&aposs the shelf life of homemade cleaners? Most natural, DIY cleaning solutionsꃊn last up to a month. But some ingredients (like hydrogen peroxide) lose their potency more quickly. Your best bet is to mix up enoughਏor only a onetime use.

Ready to start mixing and cleaning? Take a look at our cleaning recipes below, organized in one convenient chart, or read on for a full breakdown of each recipe.


Over the past 60 years, Americans' spending on food has consistently shifted toward restaurant spending, according to Riehle.

He said he doesn't expect that to change in 2020, with people's digital lives leading them to value even more the social aspect of dining at a brick-and-mortar restaurant.

"There are two reasons people go to a restaurant: convenience and socialization," Riehle said. "While there is a long-term trend of restaurants coming to consumers and people having more meal occasions centered around delivery or takeout, people do still crave being at a physical restaurant for being around other people, for that atmosphere you can't recreate at home, and for special occasions."


Watch the video: 6. video - Διαχείριση Γραφείου Ισοζύγιο πελατών προμηθευτών σύμφωνα με τις αναγκες του γραφείου (January 2022).